Advice

Seven things Aussies might find hard to get used to in Canada

No two countries are the same, and there will always be things that surprise you in a new place. Here are seven things Aussies will find different and little hard to get used to when they move to Canada (and some of these apply to the USA as well).

1. Lower pay

Across the board, it is almost certain that you will make less money here for doing the exact same work you were doing in Australia.

Example, when I was working at McDonald’s Australia in 2006, I was getting paid $21AUD per hour. The minimum wage in Ontario at that time was $7.75CAD.

In 2012, I was working at Sydney Airport for $24AUD per hour, increased to $27AUD per hour if my shift was between midnight and 4am. I moved to Toronto and got the exact same job two months later and was paid $12CAD an hour.

The minimum wage in Canada varies by province. In Ontario it’s $14 an hour. With the current AUDCAD exchange rate where 1CAD = $1.09AUD, that’s $15.26 an hour before taxes.

And it was only raised a couple of years ago. From $11.40. Which means that a lot of roles that were above minumum wage, paying $14 to $16 an hour, were considered “good” pay, and not all have caught up and increased their pay.

So you could be doing work like office administration and be getting basically minimum wage.

2. Less vacation time

Oh cute, did you think you were going to come do a working holiday in Canada and then spend all your free time travelling everywhere?

Well good luck doing that with only ten paid vacation days PER YEAR. And most of the time, you can’t let them roll over into the next year.

Coming from a country where most jobs give you about 4 weeks of paid vacation, it’s a bit of a shock to the system when you come here and learn that every year, your employer will only give you ten (10) paid vacation days.

Unlike doing a working holiday in the UK, where you can fly to another country for the weekend and pay a ridiculously cheap fair – flights within Canada are pretty pricey, and, as outlined in point number one, you’re not getting paid a lot here.

Sure, you can drive – but car rentals are also really expensive, and Canada is the second largest land mass in the world, which means it takes a LONG time to travel by car.

Are you okay with not going back to Australia until your visa is done? Or if you do stay here, only going once every few years?

Because your ten paid vacation days equal one decent trip to visit home per year. If you choose to use your vacation in another way, such as a few days in Vegas or going to the UK for a week, you can kiss the trip home goodbye. So you kind of have to choose between taking vacations elsewhere, taking a “stay-cation”, or using the time to go home.

Unless, you take the last week in December and the first week in January off. That way, you’re only using 5 of the days per year.

Or, it IS possible to go to Australia for a week. I’ve done it. I don’t recommend it, because you spend about as much time on a plane as you do in Australia, but it’s definitely possible!

3. Tipping

Yes, if you’ve been to the USA or Canada once in your life, you know that you’re supposed to tip wait staff and bartenders.

But, did you know you’re also expected to tip for other services? Cab and Uber drivers? Delivery people? Hairdressers? Estheticians? Movers? The list is substantial.

Which brings me to number four.

4. Taxes not being included in the price

In most cases, the marked price you see is never what you’re going to pay. From food to electronics to your monthly phone plan, you always have to factor in what the added taxes are going to be when you get to the checkout/receive your bill.

Not only does it trick you into thinking that things are cheaper than they really are (because those $50 jeans are really $56.50 with taxes) but it also makes it really hard to budget.

When you factor in taxes and then add on a tip if necessary, it gets pricey!

I have no idea why it’s like this and it’s really annoying. Canadians joke that it’s the government’s way of keeping their citizens’ math skills sharp, or it’s so you know the retailer isn’t ripping you off.

Well that’s all fine…. but can’t we just include the taxes in the price??

5. Disgusting processed food

When I first moved here, unless it was fruits, veggies and animal products, everything I ate made me feel sick. There are so many crazy ingredients in processed food here, it’s scary to read labels.

Like bread! It basically tastes like cake, with all the sugar they put in it, and the enriched wheat flour doesn’t help.

Chocolate and sodas are sweetened with corn syrup instead of cane sugar, and they taste much sweeter than those same products in Australia.

I’ve been a choco-holic sugar junkie my entire life, but after moving here I greatly reduced the amount of that stuff I was eating, because I found it tasted awful (probably a good thing, I know).

The best example are McDonald’s fries. In Canada and the USA, they’re made with NINETEEN ingredients!!! In Australia, it’s only THREE.

I bought a generic brand of vanilla “ice cream” the other day without reading the label. It tasted like egg whites so I threw it out. The garbage bag I had put it in had a hole in it, so the remainder melted and dripped through. All that dripped out was sticky corn syrup. It was so disgusting! My floor was covered in goo! Where was the melted milk/cream? How is that ice cream???

Unfortunately, to avoid the nasties, you have to spend more money. It’s really tempting to buy the $1 chips instead of the $4 ones, until you turn the package over and find and additional 5 gross ingredients on the $1 one that you just don’t want to put into your body.

You start to get really good at reading labels.

6. Watching what you say/how you say it

I’ve written about this before with specific examples (read it here), but the Australian vernacular can be quite a lot to take, because we tend to speak in a straight-forward way.

Canadians are more reserved, which is one of the reasons they have a reputation for being so nice. Sometimes, you can accidentally put a Canadian off by using a phrase that is considered friendly in Australia.

A great example: When you do something nice for someone in Australia, or give them a gift, and they say “thank you”, you respond with “that’s alright!” which is the equivalent to “my pleasure”.

But in Canada, “that’s alright” is used more when someone apologises for something. So it’s a little weird for them to hear you say “that’s alright” because it kind of sounds like you were doing them a favour. It’s more polite to say “you’re welcome.”

This is just one example that I noticed in my interactions with people here over the years. It’s not a hard and fast rule and it doesn’t apply to everyone and everything!

7. Being inside a lot

This one is specific to Eastern Canada.

Unless you enjoy a wind chill of -12C blowing on your face, or tiptoeing on icy sidewalks, you’d better get used to an indoor life from as early as November until as late as May.

Thankfully there are many facilities around the country where you can enjoy “outdoor” activities indoors, such as indoor golf courses, indoor soccer “fields”, indoor walking tracks, and so on. But being in the fresh air and surrounded by nature usually requires some level of being freezing.

So there you have it, seven things you might have to get used to if you choose to live here! Prepare yourself!

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Culture

October is the best month of the year

It’s almost the end of October and it’s time to kiss the best month of the year goodbye.

I’m in love with October, and I know I’m not the only one. From Anne of Green Gables to your favourite Instagram influencer, October is a much-favourited month.

I know what you’re thinking. “NOT ANOTHER PIECE OF CONTENT ABOUT OCTOBER AND PUMPKINS AND FALL!!!!”

But I’m okay with that, because October is spectacular, and it deserves to have a huge deal made about it, over and over and over again.

October is an interesting month. It’s when so many things come to a close yet so many things begin.

It’s the end of the warm weather in northern countries, yet the beginning of it in the south.

October means there’s only three months left of the year, and people start counting down to things. There’s this many days until American Thanksgiving…. There’s this many days until Christmas… Now there’s this many days until the end of the year…

I don’t do that. I savour each day of this amazing month. The years go by fast enough as it is. Even if it’s been a crappy year, I always seem to feel better in October. Like there’s a chance for new beginnings.

I’m not sure why, since that is usually a sentiment associated with January.

Maybe because, where I grew up, October is the second month of spring. It’s already hot enough to go to the beach and signals the beginning of another long Australian summer.

(It’s also a month of wildly unpredictable weather, and to this day I still don’t get why Australian brides plan their weddings for October, because you never know what you’re going to get. Risking a thunderstorm on your wedding day is no bride’s dream.)

In fact, August is the best month to have a wedding in Australia, specifically in Sydney, because the days are usually sunny and quite warm for “winter”.

You’re welcome.

But back to Canada.

In Canada, October means many things, such as:

Pumpkin everything

Yes, unlike in Australia, pumpkins, squash and all those other related gifts from Mother Nature are only available in fall, and most abundantly October.

Perfect timing too, because the temperatures start to stay in the one digit range, and you want to get into that warming, soup-making groove.

And if you’re a food or beverage brand, you capitalize on that pumpkin-mania like there’s no tomorrow. You name it, there’s a pumpkin version

Pumpkin spice lattes, pumpkin spice bread, pumpkin cheesecake, pumpkin spice cookies, pumpkin spice cereal, oatmeal, ice cream, crackers, BEER. The list goes on and on.

Pumpkin carving

I know for a fact you can’t really do this in Australia because you can’t get these types of pumpkins there.

Apples galore

The thing about Canada is that its climate doesn’t lend itself to the production of many varieties of fresh produce. Apart from the very short summer where you suddenly can’t get away from summer squash, asparagus and corn, most of the food you will eat here for at least half the year is unfortunately imported.

Except for apples. Canada is absolutely lousy with apples. In fact, there are too many, and most of them end up in landfill. There are apple trees all over the GTA whose fruits just drop and decay without anyone paying any attention. It’s unfortunate since organic, unwaxed apples cost a fortune, and I have no idea why it’s like this.

At least you can enjoy an apple cider why you contemplate this conundrum.

Chestnuts

You sing about them, but have you eaten them? Not only are they delicious, they are also so fun to make. Roasting them on an open fire is ideal, but cooking them on the stove or in the oven also works. It’s a great way to keep warm when it’s super chilly outside, because you do have to stand there and watch them so you definitely get warm.

Make sure you look up how to prepare them first though, so you don’t end up with them exploding all over your oven like I did.

True story.

Indian corn

Colourful but inedible, it makes a great fall decoration

The leaves omg

Well duh.

But remember, I grew up on the east coast of Australia, where Autumn can often be just as hot and sunny as summer. I know other parts of Australia experience something closer to a northern hemisphere fall, but I certainly never went to those places. Plus, it’s a different time of year. So it’s not the same.

Therefore, I get to be overly excited every October and take 500 pictures that look something like this and not have you judge me for how basic I am.

Fall walks and bike rides

Fall is a spectacular time of year to learn that Toronto is a lot bigger than you think! Don’t listen to those snobs that scoff at the idea of going north of Bloor or east of the Don Valley Parkway. Because there are so many amazing walking and biking trails to discover and doing it in the fall just takes your breath away.

Halloween!

And it actually feels like Halloween here because they’ve been doing it for years. Australia is still divided over whether Halloween is to be acknowledged.

Some of the Halloween stuff here is really cool. Seeing people’s houses decorated is my favourite.

It’s also really fun to walk through certain neighbourhoods and be around all the kids trick-or-treating (since us adult Aussies missed out on that experience when we were kids).

Other times its just brands throwing some orange and black colors on things and calling it Halloween (cough Tim Horton’s cough)

Nuit Blanche

This one is only in Toronto and it means White Night. It’s an interesting annual event where art (and that term is used very broadly) is displayed all around the city. It goes all night, so energetic night owls can roam the streets until dawn enjoying the extravaganza.

Please enjoy these terrible photos I took at Nuit Blanche in 2013.

Those are some of the things I love about October and that’s why I think it’s the best month of the year.

It’s also the best month to enjoy all that fall has to offer, in my opinion.

Because of how quickly it gets cold here, by mid-November , it’s already lot colder than October, most of the leaves and the colours are gone, and there’s nothing really fun to do (even Canadian Thanksgiving is in October.)

So it’s a rush to enjoy it all in October, before Christmas and New Years fly by and then the long winter sets in.

That means, if you hate winter, fall is actually really depressing because of what comes after it. But it sure is pretty.

Maybe I should make it all one hashtag: #octoberthebestmonthoftheyear

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Food and drink

Canada’s most famous cocktail (Plus, the one drink you shouldn’t order in North America)

Canadians sure love their alcoholic beverages. Whether it’s a summer cider on a patio, a pumpkin ale in fall or a Christmas eggnog if you’re so inclined, there’s a drink for every time of year.

While their neighbours to the south are famous for their dirt cheap and widely available liquor, alcohol in Canada is still quite inexpensive when compared to Australia.

And just like Australia, Canada has many breweries, distilleries and wineries that make amazing craft beers, liquors and wines, including some limited-edition, small batch brews.

Everyone in North America: “Wait, WHAT? I thought Australians only drank Fosters beer!”

Sorry to crush your dreams (likely inspired by that one episode of The Simpsons where they go to Australia), but no, they don’t.

And don’t even get me started on knifey-spoony.

Now, back to what I was saying about CANADA.

You will never run out of options for alcoholic beverages here and you can look forward to different varieties at different times of the year.

But for a truly Canadian experience, you have to try Canada’s drink, the almighty Caesar.

If you’ve ever been to North America, or flown through there, you’ll have noticed that tomato juice is a staple beverage available everywhere.

So, it’s not surprising that tomato-juice based cocktails, like the Bloody Mary, are also a staple on a drinks menu.

The Caesar takes it a step further. A uniquely Canadian drink, it’s close to a Bloody Mary, but it has a lot more kick. Its salty, spicy flavour is super satisfying and even filling.

The recipe is vodka, tomato juice mixed with clam broth, lime, hot sauce and Worcestershire sauce.

Clam broth? WHAT?

Okay, it sounds a little out there (and maybe a little gross to some) but it’s actually really good.

But don’t worry, you won’t see a bartender straining the juice from a pile of clams into your drink. There is a pre-mixed beverage used in most Caesar’s called Clamato, and it’s made by Mott’s.

Caesars are served in a glass rimmed with celery salt and usually garnished with one or more savoury toppings, like a pickled bean, a celery stick or some olives.

Adventurous bartenders are known to dress them up with all kinds of pickles and meats, and some of them are served towering with what looks like a vertical charcuterie spread.

I’ve even seen some that have an entire meal perched on top of them, including a full-sized hamburger!

The art of the Caesar garnish is almost a sport. Mott’s even held a Canada-wide competition to find the best Caesar in the country.

According to my sources, the Caesar is one of the most commonly-craved and sought after drinks by Canadians living abroad (especially in Australia), but since it isn’t really sold anywhere in Australia (except maybe Canadian-themed bars) Canadians make their own at home.

If that’s not your thing, no worries! There are plenty of options to suit your fancy.

But here is a tip for ordering drinks in North America.

If you order anything with lemonade, you will literally get lemonade

As in, freshly squeezed lemon juice mixed with sugar. In Canada (and the USA) that’s what people will give you if you say lemonade.

But most likely, they won’t have it and they will look at you funny because they don’t realise you mean the soft drink, not something kids on TV sell on the sidewalk for pocket money.

If you want the soda, you have to ask for Sprite or 7-Up.

And don’t forget to tip! It’s the North American way.

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Expat Life

Why I avoided Australians when I first moved to Canada

I bet you read the title and thought, “Um, who do you think you are?

Let me explain.

I read this post from The Betoota Advocate and they had quoted a representative from The Australian Bureau of Statistics who said the fact that only 1 in 30 Australian expats make friends with locals is pathetic.

That got me thinking about how I hear expats talk about how hard it is to make friends with locals when they’re on a working holiday. They often end up hanging out with other expats who also have an expiry date and soon leave them.

So they cycle through friends for the one to two years they’re there, and if they are lucky enough to transition to a permanent visa, find themselves lonely because all their expat friends have left. If they leave at the end of their visa, all they did was hang out with a bunch of people who were also foreigners.

Is there anything wrong with this? Of course not.

It makes sense, because expats flock to the parts of the country that are most famous and have the best resources for temporary residents. It’s also comforting to surround yourself with people who are going through the same thing as you are.

But are you really going to experience what life is like in your new country if you construct your life so that it feels exactly like your home country?

It’s kind of like learning a new language – you can study and practice it all you want, and know how to speak it in theory, but that can’t compare to immersing yourself in an environment where they communicate in that language.

That’s why when I came here, I decided that the best way to truly experience the Canadian way of life was to make my life fully Canadian.

That meant embracing everything Canada had to offer that Australia didn’t, including its people. It also meant avoiding parts of the country that have a huge concentration of Aussies, like Whistler. So many Australians go there that is has earnt the nickname “Whistralia” and they call Australians “Jafas” which stands for “just another f***ing Aussie.”

I did so because I thought to myself, I’m not going to move to the other side of the world just to feel like I haven’t left. I want the country to feel very different and new, and it won’t feel that way if I’m surrounded by Australians.

I was so excited by this new adventure that I totally embraced my new life in Canada and kind of ignored my life back in Australia. I didn’t keep up with anything that was going on back home and I focused fully on life in Canada. I figured it would always be there waiting for me when I went home.

Obviously I don’t have anything against Australians! I’m Australian, and I love my people, of course! I just think it would have been a different experience for me if I had closed myself off to building relationships in Canada by finding my Aussie tribe and relying on them to carry me through my time here.

I couldn’t avoid it forever though. After about five years I started to get really homesick and I wanted to be around Aussies again, and I ended up finding a couple of Facebook groups and of course met some cool ones living here.

But I’m glad that at first, my social circle was mostly locals because I didn’t have the Australian way of life influencing the experience I was having in Canada, and I could see what life here was really like.

I also didn’t have the cushion of having mostly Australian friends to see me through my time there, so it forced me to make friends with locals, no matter how hard it was. Because it can be hard!

If I didn’t, maybe my experience would have been totally different. Or maybe I just secretly loved being the only Australian amongst all my Canadian friends and I didn’t want to share the spotlight!

What do you think? Is it better to seek out familiarity in an unfamiliar situation, or dive into the uncertainty of a whole new world?

Let me know in the comments!

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